ORKSHOP THEATRE

of South Carolina

2013-2014 SEASON       2014-2015 SEASON

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BEEHIVE the 60's Musical

September 13-28, 2013
Created by
- Larry Gallagher
Directors - Jocelyn Sanders and Daniel Gainey
Music director - Roland Haynes, Jr.
Choreography - Barbara Howse-Diemer
Show sponsor - Jack and Renate Jansen

Beehive is a high-energy musical revue tracing the coming of age of women's music through 37 popular hits of the girl groups and solo singers of the 1960's. The Chiffons, The Supremes, Tina Turner, and Aretha Franklin are just some of the 60's pop stars portrayed by the super talented cast. Hear such favorites as My Boyfriend’s Back, One Fine Day, Where the Boys Are, Downtown, Proud Mary, (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman, and Respect. More Info

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Sleuth

November 8-23, 2013
By
- Anthony Shaffer
Director - Eric Bultman
Show sponsor
SC Blue Retail

The ultimate game of cat-and-mouse is played out in a cozy English country house owned by celebrated mystery writer, Andrew Wyke. Invited guest Milo Tindle, a young rival who shares not only Wyke's love of the game but also his wife, has come to lay claim. Revenge is devised and murders plotted as the two plan the ultimate whodunnit. More Info

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Crimes of the Heart

January 10-25, 2014
By
- Beth Henley
Director - Jocelyn Sanders
Show Sponsor -

The scene is Hazlehurst, Mississippi, where the three Magrath sisters have gathered to await news of the family patriarch, their grandfather, who is living out his last hours in the local hospital. Lenny, the oldest sister, is unmarried at thirty and facing diminishing marital prospects; Meg, the middle sister, who quickly outgrew Hazlehurst, is back after a failed singing career on the West Coast; while Babe, the youngest, is out on bail after having shot her husband in the stomach. Their troubles, grave and yet, somehow, hilarious, are highlighted by their priggish cousin, Chick, and by the awkward young lawyer who tries to keep Babe out of jail while helpless not to fall in love with her. In the end the play is the story of how its young characters escape the past to seize the future — but the telling is so true and touching and consistently hilarious that it will linger in the mind long after the curtain has descended. Warm-hearted, irreverent, zany and brilliantly imaginative, the play teems with humanity and humor as it examines the plight of three young Mississippi sisters betrayed by their passions. More Info

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Biloxi Blues

March 14-29, 2014
By
- Neil Simon
Director - David Britt

The second in Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Neil Simon's trilogy which began with Brighton Beach Memoirs and concluded with Broadway Bound. When we last met Eugene Jerome, he was coping with adolescence in 1930's Brooklyn. Here, he is a young army recruit during WW II, going through basic training and learning about Life and Love with a capital 'L' along with some harsher lessons, while stationed at boot camp in Biloxi, Mississippi in 1943.

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Young Frankenstein

May 9-24, 2014
Book
- Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan
Music and Lyrics - Mel Brooks
Director - Chad Henderson
Show sponsor
BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina

IT'S ALIVE! From the creators of the record-breaking Broadway sensation THE PRODUCERS comes this monster new musical comedy. With such memorable tunes as "The Transylvania Mania," "He Vas My Boyfriend" and "Puttin' On The Ritz," YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN is scientifically-proven, monstrously good entertainment…and the only place you'll witness a singing and dancing laboratory experiment in the largest tuxedo ever made.
BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

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Season Shows
Non-season Shows
2014-2015 Season

Auditions

NON-SEASON SHOW

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Doctor Dolittle

July 12-27, 2013
Director:
EG Heard Engle
Music Director: Daniel Ganiey
Choreographer: Katie Hilliger
Book, music and lyrics by: Leslie Bricusse
Based on the Doctor Dolittle Stories by Hugh Lofting and the Twentieth Century Fox film

The classic tale of kindness to animals and animal kindnesses trots, crawls and flies onto the stage in Doctor Dolittle, the big Broadway-sized family musical. All of the characters we've come to love through the stories of Hugh Lofting and the magical movie musical are given new life in the stage version. The musical concerns the classic tale of a wacky but kind Doctor who can talk to animals. The show takes the audience on a journey from the small English village of Puddleby-in-the-Marsh to the far corners of the world. Doctor Dolittle is wrongly accused of murder and, once pronounced innocent, continues with his search for the Great Pink Sea Snail -- the oldest and wisest of the creatures on earth.


2014-2015 SEASON SHOWS

The 2014-2015 Season shows will be performed at 701 Whaley.

Lend Me a Tenor by Ken Ludwig (Directed by Jocelyn Sanders)

Lend Me A Tenor is set in September 1934. Saunders, the general manager of the Cleveland Grand Opera Company, is primed to welcome world famous, Tito Morelli, Il Stupendo, the greatest tenor of his generation, to appear for one night only as Otello. The star arrives late and, through a hilarious series of mishaps, is given a double dose of tranquilizers and passes out. His pulse is so low that Saunders and his assistant Max believe he's dead. In a frantic attempt to salvage the evening, Saunders persuades Max to get into Morelli's Otello costume and fool the audience into thinking he's Il Stupendo. Max succeeds admirably, but Morelli comes to and gets into his other costume ready to perform. Now two Otellos are running around in costume and two women are running around in lingerie, each thinking she is with Il Stupendo. A sensation on Broadway and in London's West End, this madcap, screwball comedy is guaranteed to leave audiences teary-eyed with laughter. It was directed on Broadway by Jerry Zaks, and in London by David Gilmore.

The Dining Room by A.R. Gurney (Directed by Daniel Gainey)

The play is set in the dining room of a typical well-to-do household, the place where the family assembled daily for breakfast and dinner and for any and all special occasions. The action is comprised of a mosaic of interrelated scenes-some funny, some touching, some rueful-which, taken together, create an in-depth portrait of a vanishing species: the upper-middle-class WASP. The actors change roles, personalities and ages with virtuoso skill as they portray a wide variety of characters, from little boys to stern grandfathers, and from giggling teenage girls to Irish housemaids. Each vignette introduces a new set of people and events; a father lectures his son on grammar and politics; a boy returns from boarding school to discover his mother's infidelity; a senile grandmother doesn't recognize her own sons at Christmas dinner; a daughter, her marriage a shambles, pleads futilely to return home, etc. Dovetailing swiftly and smoothly, the varied scenes coalesce, ultimately, into a theatrical experience of exceptional range, compassionate humor and abundant humanity.

Stick Fly by Lydia R. Diamond (Directed by Barkari Lebby)

The affluent, African-American LeVay family is gathering at their Martha's Vineyard home for the weekend, and brothers Kent and Flip have each brought their respective ladies home to meet the parents for the first time. Kent's fiancée Taylor, an academic whose absent father was a prominent author, struggles to fit into the LeVay's upper-crust lifestyle. Kimber, on the other hand, is a selfdescribed WASP who works with inner-city school children, fits in more easily with the family. Joining these two couples are the demanding LeVay patriarch Joe and Cheryl, the daughter of the family's longtime housekeeper. As the two newcomers butt heads over issues of race and privilege, longstanding family tensions bubble under the surface and reach a boiling point when secrets are revealed.

Broadway Bound by Neil Simon (Directed by David Britt)

Finalist! 1987 Pulitzer Prize in Drama Part three of Neil Simon's acclaimed autobiographical trilogy finds Eugene and his older brother Stanley trying to break into the world of show business as professional comedy writers while coping with their parents break-up and eventual divorce. When their material is broadcast on the radio for the first time, the family is upset to hear a thinly-veiled portrait of themselves played for laughs.

Five Guys Named Moe (Directed by Lou Warth Boeschen)

Book by Clarke Peters
Music and Lyrics by Louis Jordan


His woman left him, he's broke, and it's almost five o'clock in the mornin'. But don't be worryin' 'bout our hero, Nomax. Out of Nomax's '30s-style radio pop FIVE GUYS NAMED MOE. They cajole, wheedle, comfort and jazz him with the whimsical hit songs of Louis Jordan, one of the most beloved songwriting talents of the twentieth century. With more than fifty top ten singles on the rhythm and blues charts, this great composer and saxophonist brought a popular new slant to jazz that paved the way for the rock-and-roll of the 1950's.